Tiny white arms reached from the mung beans, they had begun to sprout. I had started this project of sprouting  seeds as a way to give variety to our Paleo diet, I hadn’t expected shoots so soon!

Kit for sprouting

Kit for sprouting

Someone experienced could say I cheated, because I bought a kit at our local whole foods store that has the sprouting trays, beans and a guide as to how long to soak and wash. I picked out alfalfa, mung, and buckwheat beans to sprout for my future recipes.

Reading the guide provided I was able to determine how long that the beans needed to be soaked in jars before I laid them in the towering trays. I placed them on a shelf behind the wood stove, so that they had a warm relaxing place to soak far from curious hands and peering eyes.

Out of sight they were out of mind, and they soaked for a bit to long and they began to sprout before they were laid out!

Sprouts in trays

Sprouts in trays

Each type of beans has a certain way they must be cared for them to sprout as effectively as possible. Both the mung beans and alfalfa were laid in the trays and watered. The buckwheat are laid atop soil in the tray and then watered. Each must be watered a few times a day so that they stay wet. If the beans dry out then they will not sprout as well, or not at all (I’ve learned the hard way).

I choose the buckwheat and mung beans so that I would be able to make sprouted flour for Paleo breads and other baked goods. The alfalfa I thought might be tasty for salads, burgers, and something to put in green smoothies. When eating fresh having a variety of different greens, alternative flours and new things to cook helps to make sure that we don’t burn out and return to unhealthy eating.

Related Posts